27 May 2019

That some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still face discrimination and prejudice when accessing health services is an uncomfortable truth.

But as the theme of this year’s National Reconciliation Week states, the relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the broader community must be grounded in a foundation of truth if we are to foster positive race relations and reconciliation.

North Western Melbourne Primary Health Network (NWMPHN) has been working hard to eliminate discrimination and close the gap in health since we were founded in 2015, commissioning a range of targeted services and supports for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

NWMPHN CEO Adjunct Associate Professor Christopher Carter said discrimination remains a key barrier to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal people in our region.

“That’s why we’re increasing our cultural safety training program for general practices, helping them provide culturally appropriate and welcoming services to their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients,” A/Prof Carter said.

“This in turn can help their patients feel comfortable to identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander when they attend their general practice, allowing them to access targeted services such as Aboriginal Health Checks.”

NWMPHN is also currently funding six local providers to deliver the Integrated Team Care program, supporting Aboriginal people with chronic disease and complex health conditions access services that are clinically and culturally appropriate.

 Find out more about NWMPHN’s Aboriginal health services
 reconciliation.org.au

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